On This Journey

Hey, traveling companions!  Cure back again to share more of my Crealitation success story.   Last month a number of milestone achievements surfaced for me.  I’ll be telling that tale in the Crew Blog over the next four weeks.  Today’s segment looks at the preparation and the trip to upstate New York.  Subsequent submissions will cover my third stay at the Art Farm, recording the final tracks for five of my songs at Old Soul Studios, and my trek back to South Dakota.

                                  Cure, at home in South Dakota

                                  Cure, at home in South Dakota

In my earlier blogs, I described my good fortune in becoming a friend and student of Cassidy A. Maze.  She introduced me to her process for creating your own reality called Crealitation, and showed me how the process helps us discover our gifts, and then how to bring those gifts into reality. In January 2016, I left my job to complete one of those gifts: a demonstration – through music and other medium – of how to recognize and embrace that which binds us together, rather than that which keeps us apart.

In August, I recorded the basic tracks for seven songs for my project, currently known as the Navel Tribe Center for Wandering Kin. The next phase was to return to New York to complete at least four of the songs, The finished songs would then be used to further promote the larger project. 

Maze reminded me of the steps involved in Crealitation: Think it, Write it, Do it.  I spent my station time during the coming weeks focused on meditation, visualizing myself raising the money, accomplishing timely tasks at home that would need to be addressed before leaving for 10 days, and making the trip back east.  I wrote out my ideal days for accomplishing these activities.  I doodled pictures of these events taking place, then I got busy.

My “cave drawing” of arriving at the Art Farm.  Artistic talent issues aside, drawing in my journal remains a great tool for visualization.

My “cave drawing” of arriving at the Art Farm.  Artistic talent issues aside, drawing in my journal remains a great tool for visualization.

A crucial component of this process has been the unending support of my wife, Helen, who has been extraordinarily supportive and understanding of my journey.  Our sole household breadwinner during this year long effort, she continues to encourage me to complete my work and move forward with this project.  She again sent me on my way with her enduring love and her usual question, voiced through different words, but always the same under the surface, “how can I help?”  She provided support throughout this process.

A major challenge for my preparation was raising the money to cover my expenses – studio time, musician fees, travel costs, etc.  Maze coached me regarding options available for fundraising and what approach may best fit my current needs at this stage of the journey. Following her guidance, I took timelines, budgets and rough mixes of my favorite songs and reached out to those familiar with my work to assess their level of interest, either in supporting me directly, or providing leads on who else would be a good connection.  The process worked.  Money in hand, I scheduled studio time that would allow me to return home prior to winter’s unofficial arrival. 

Maze was generous as always in setting up lodging at the Art Farm, my beloved home away from home.  We also had a session covering the music I planned to record.  She provided considerations I should keep in mind regarding my eventual audience and how to keep my goals clear as the work unfolds. 

With this advice in mind, I began assembling the essentials.  I made copies of the music we would be recording for the musicians to use.  I packed up my Crealitation journals and grabbed my “travel station kit” to ensure I would have a portable Crealitation station with me wherever I laid my head each day.

For budgetary reasons, I chose to drive to New York once again.  The 1,500 miles trip is two days of travel each way for me .  Covering an adequate distance each day is dependent on staying in motion as much as possible. Accordingly, I brought enough food and beverage to enable “lunching” and hydration on the road, planning stops only for fuel and, of course,  to rest or reinvigorate as needed.  Making good time on the road also requires keeping a clear mind.  Safety first, after all...

Minor injury sustained from making a sandwich while driving.

Minor injury sustained from making a sandwich while driving.

…or maybe not.  On a rolling section of I-90, I learned a valuable lesson regarding making peanut butter sandwiches in a moving vehicle.  First, bring a knife with you.  Second, if you have forgotten a butter knife and decide to use your Swiss army knife as a substitute, exercise some caution cleaning the blade on bumpy roads.  Or better yet.  Make the sandwiches ahead of time.

                                      A sign of things to come.

                                      A sign of things to come.

The extremely minor injury aside, the trip was beautiful.  Blue skies, easy roads and the knowledge that only time and distance separated me from my home away from home, where making dreams a reality is second nature.  My next installment will focus on my time with Maze, LDMK and JRB at the Art Farm.  Until then, love Now.